Depression: personal blogs and stories

We all experience variations in mood – a general low frame of mind, or in response to specific things that happen. It’s also common to hear people say they are depressed if they feel sad or miserable. But depression is a serious mental health problem. It can interfere with everyday life – over long periods of time or in regular bursts.

As depression can be an ‘invisible’ illness, some people find it difficult to understand the effect it can have. They might see depression as trivial or dismiss it altogether. And this can make it harder for those experiencing it to speak openly and seek the help they need.

What is depression?

When you talk about being depressed, you often see people giving you this look, like they’re not quite sure what to do or say... But, don’t ignore them. Make eye contact, bring them crisps, give them a quick ring, listen to them. And tell them it’s going to be okay – until they are strong enough to say it to themselves.”
Christina writes about how depression can be a difficult thing to talk about >>

Depression is the most common mental health disorder in Britain, according to the Mental Health Foundation. It is a very real illness, and debilitating symptoms might include feelings of helplessness, crying, anxiety, low self-esteem, a lack of energy, sleeping difficulties, physical aches and pains, and a bleak view of the future.

Depression shows itself in many different ways, but it typically interferes with a person’s ability to function, feel pleasure or take an interest in things. Find out about symptoms, treatments and tips for managing it on the NHS, Rethink Mental Illness and Mind websites.

The stigma around depression

The hardest part of depression is finding a way to tell people. It is like you are hiding a terrible secret. I think I felt ashamed of myself for getting depression, like somehow I had failed. That’s what depression does to you: it makes you feel like a terrible failure."
Dave blogs about what depression feels like >>

Mental health problems are common, but nearly nine in ten people who experience them say they face stigma and discrimination as a result. This stigma and discrimination can be one of the hardest parts of the overall experience because it might mean lost friendships, isolation, exclusion from activities, difficulties in getting and keeping a job, not finding help and a slower recovery. Equally, stigma can cause us to shy away from the people around us who might need our support.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

How can I help?

The aim of the Time to Change campaign is to encourage us all to be more open about our mental health, and to start conversations with those who might need our support.

Why not find out how you could start a conversation about mental health?

You could share a blog story to raise awareness. You could sign up to receive Time to Change emails. And, you might want to add your name to our pledge wall, joining the thousands of people who are taking small steps to be more open about mental health.

Personal blogs about living with depression

The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of depression. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.


There is still some way to go in changing attitudes in the mental health profession

In 2004 I experienced depression. Lol's blog This had been creeping up on me for almost a year, like a dark shadow, insidious and foreboding. Eventually the shadow totally eclipsed me and I gave in. I had 'masked' the symptoms for so long my depression had become a way of life - I accepted it without question.

I made a pledge never to stand for discrimination

Now you’ve started reading, I first want to thank you for having the courage to make it this far. It would be wrong, and furthermore reckless, for me to try and guess where you’ve been, what you’ve suffered, and where you’re going in life. I can’t do that. What I can do is offer my blessing that you’ll never be alone in your suffering, even if that seems impossible. Even in the very darkest of moments, the greatest strength WE have is each other. The greatest strength your demons have is SILENCE. Don’t ever forget that.

I am finding living with anxiety tough but I am speaking up

Throughout my younger years, I'd always been the 'happy kid'. Sian's blog The one that was always smiling and joking. I was confident too, taking part in plays and volunteering answers in class. When I got to the age of 14, I started to feel 'down', or at least that was how I thought of it. Suddenly I lacked the enthusiasm I once had.

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