Friends, family and mental health: blogs and stories

These blogs are written by people with personal experience of mental health problems and about their experiences of friends, family and mental health. This could be a mother writing about how she supported her daughter or someone writing about how their friends treated them differently after learning of their mental illness

Our Stigma Shout survey showed that almost 9 out of 10 people with mental health problems (87%) reported the negative impact of stigma and discrimination on their lives. The research also showed that the way family, friends, neighbours and colleagues behave can have a big impact on the lives of people with mental health problems.

Simply talking to someone about their mental health problem can help strengthen relationships, help recovery and challenge the stigmatising stereotypes that surround mental illness.

By writing about their personal experiences of mental health, these bloggers aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects people across the country. Pledge to share your experience of mental health today >>


Feeling proud, happy, and depressed - all at the same time

It is hard to be suicidal when you have a full time job, a four year old and a husband who adores you.

It is difficult to accept you are feeling suicidal when you have your son’s arms wrapped around you, work is going well and your husband is singing funny songs to make you both laugh.

It is a struggle to even accept you are wading through suicidal thoughts, while watching your four year old practice for a mother’s day assembly, where he will be singing 'Supermum' at top volume, while giving you the best jazz hands you have seen this side of 1999.

Living with a personality disorder, one day at a time

Last summer, my boyfriend dumped me. It was a serious relationship and we were about to get married. It wasn’t a healthy relationship. I used him as my crutch. I told myself ‘as long as I have him, I’ll be fine.’ I knew that there was a possibility he could leave and not necessarily by choice e.g. a tragic accident could befall him.  I knew that when he left, I wouldn’t be able to cope but I didn’t do anything about it. This proved to be a serious mistake.

There is nothing wrong with needing a little support

Hi I'm Kayleigh, and I'm 25.Kaylee's blog I've always found it hard to speak out. I always knew I had issues within myself, and I've always felt a let-down to my family that I didn't fit in. I never felt I could speak to my mother as I automatically thought she would judge and be disappointed in me. The prospect of being mentally ill was daunting and scary I just wanted to feel normal.

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