Mental health stigma and discrimination: blogs and stories

1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year. When we make assumptions about how mental health problems will affect someone's behaviour, this makes it more likely that they will be singled out, or labelled as different, dangerous or strange. This is what we call stigma. Treating someone differently from how we treat others because of their mental health, whether consciously or subconsciously, is what we call discrimination.

People with mental illnesses often experience stigma and discrimination that can be worse than the illness itself. In our Stigma Shout survey, 9 out 10 people with mental health problems reported the negative impact of stigma and discrimination on their lives.

These blogs are written by people who have personal experiences of mental health stigma or discrimination and illustrate how it can affect them.

You can help by ensuring your friend or relative is not afraid to speak out about mental health or is left wondering where they can turn for help. Read our tips on talking or pledge to talk about mental health today >>


Living with a personality disorder, one day at a time

Last summer, my boyfriend dumped me. It was a serious relationship and we were about to get married. It wasn’t a healthy relationship. I used him as my crutch. I told myself ‘as long as I have him, I’ll be fine.’ I knew that there was a possibility he could leave and not necessarily by choice e.g. a tragic accident could befall him.  I knew that when he left, I wouldn’t be able to cope but I didn’t do anything about it. This proved to be a serious mistake.

I blog to improve understanding of mental health

For three years, the only people who knew what I was going through and why I was struggling mentally were my family and professionals. The what can only be described as horror stories that I was told about our local psychiatric hospital made me reluctant to admit to any friends that I’d actually been an inpatient there myself. 

It is time to talk about postpartum psychosis

Psychosis. What sort of images come into your mind when you think about that word?Naomi's blog My guess is that you didn’t immediately think of a new mum with a tiny baby. Postpartum Psychosis happened to me, and happens to around 1400 new mums every year in the UK. When my first baby was just ten days old I needed to be admitted to psychiatric hospital.

If we talked more about mental health, people wouldn't wait to get help

During my second year of university, the pressure of exams was looming and I found myself in a place I had never previously been – one filled with anxiety, feelings of failure and a constant fear that I would never be good enough to embark upon the career that I had worked so hard for.

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