Mental health stigma and discrimination: blogs and stories

1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year. When we make assumptions about how mental health problems will affect someone's behaviour, this makes it more likely that they will be singled out, or labelled as different, dangerous or strange. This is what we call stigma. Treating someone differently from how we treat others because of their mental health, whether consciously or subconsciously, is what we call discrimination.

People with mental illnesses often experience stigma and discrimination that can be worse than the illness itself. In our Stigma Shout survey, 9 out 10 people with mental health problems reported the negative impact of stigma and discrimination on their lives.

These blogs are written by people who have personal experiences of mental health stigma or discrimination and illustrate how it can affect them.

You can help by ensuring your friend or relative is not afraid to speak out about mental health or is left wondering where they can turn for help. Read our tips on talking or pledge to talk about mental health today >>

People shouldn't assume that mental illness is a weakness

Hi, my name is Mary and several years ago I was in a professional job as a psychology lecturer. Perhaps I was naive, but I thought professionalism was about acting with good values and respect for others. I found out differently when I joined this college as a staff member in a small team of psychology lecturers.

My experience of attitudes towards mental health in South Asian communities

I tend not to stereotype as it goes against my belief system. But I am happy to discuss issues I faced in the South Asian community with mental illness, as after further investigation I can see that it is a culturally wide problem and not branch-specific to my family tree. 

Monty Panesar, England Spinner recently opened up about his own experiences with mental illness. Bless Monty, I rate him for coming out – it could not have been easy...

When my OCD is bad, my friends and family are incredible

My experience of mental health, much like my condition itself, runs to two extremes. 

I first realised that I wasn't 'normal' when I was at primary school, things that didn't bother other kids would send me into an absolute meltdown. A small change like a supply teacher for the day would completely throw me.

Secondary school was even worse. I was bullied for five years and the experience still dictates my feelings about myself and my view of the world to this day. 


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