1 in 6 British workers are affected by conditions like anxiety and depression every year. It is a myth that people with mental health problems can’t work. With the right support people with mental health problems perform vital roles in workplaces across the country.

However, mental health stigma and discrimination in the workplace remain an issue. The blogs below are written by people who have experience of mental illness in the workplace and show the different ways people can react.

By writing about their experiences they aim to raise awareness of the issue and challenge stereotypes around something that can affect all of us. Pledge to talk about your experiences of mental health >>

Read more about what support is available at work and information for managers and employers.


A Depressive is for Life

Here's a piece of information which might make one or two recoil in shock. For the most part you couldn't spot a depressive from any other member of society; you might need to get very close to someone before it became apparent.

Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before...No Actually Don't‚ Just Tell Someone Else Who Hasn't

Stop me if you've heard this one before...no actually don't. Having a mental illness makes finding work hard. This might sound many things; astounding, sad, ridiculous, perverse, surprising, frightening, unlikely, justifiable, understandable or just blindingly obvious. You might secretly feel something you would not publicly air. It's nothing to be ashamed of, we all have overt or latent prejudices, but it is most certainly something to be aware of and to open your mind about.

Starting employment: The reporter's story

In the 1990s during my A-Levels I developed ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome after three-weeks of type A or B influenza caused my immune system to collapse and never recover. I didn't get diagnosed for some years, so had to drop out of university, and suffered a “breakdown" more properly known as a major depressive episode.

Stevie's story

Stevie got a big shock when he was diagnosed with schizophrenia. "People think it means you're going to be violent, and I can understand it in a way, because I didn't have a very positive image of it either. Thing is, for me it couldn't be further from the truth - I'm a total softy."

It was hard for Stevie to accept his diagnosis and hard for him to tell other people too. "It's a bit like coming out and telling people you are gay," explains Stevie. "Luckily I'm well now. I haven't had a day off work for four years."

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