1 in 6 British workers are affected by conditions like anxiety and depression every year. It is a myth that people with mental health problems can’t work. With the right support people with mental health problems perform vital roles in workplaces across the country.

However, mental health stigma and discrimination in the workplace remain an issue. The blogs below are written by people who have experience of mental illness in the workplace and show the different ways people can react.

By writing about their experiences they aim to raise awareness of the issue and challenge stereotypes around something that can affect all of us. Pledge to talk about your experiences of mental health >>

Read more about what support is available at work and information for managers and employers.


People’s negative attitudes cause me more worry than my psychosis

In 2001, I began to have difficulties with functioning well and had a number of unrealistic thoughts about my social situation, which placed a strain on my friendships with the people in my social group. I also began to worry about my job security, which may or may not have been well-founded. I asked my parents if they could help me and fortunately they were happy to let me come back home and support me.

We need to allow others to open up about mental health

You hear stories of how exciting, liberating and hard-working life at university is. You get told that the many parties and mingling with like-minded people will be ‘the best time of your life’.

When I think back to the start of 2009, when I started a web development course at Manchester Metropolitan University, I remember the good times, the parties, sharing a pizza with my friend who I moved to Manchester with. I had a great time at university.

I worried what my colleagues would think about my mental health

I was about to take some goods (highly expensive goods!) to Scunthorpe Hospital and I just couldn't face it anymore. It's hard to describe the feeling; the saying “my minds going 100mph” is cliché, but that’s what it felt like. My thoughts were racing, going in every direction possible. It consumed me, taking over my every thought until it became to much. Now, everybody’s response is different; mine just happens to be wishing I wasn't here anymore. So  walked out without saying a word, drove home and I was planning on not having to deal with the consequences, if you catch my drift!?

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