Mental health problems affect 1 in 4 people every year and no one should feel ashamed. By sharing our experiences, together we can end the stigma.

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Depression had completely changed my life

Sometimes, a little push is needed to get the ball rolling. 

Despite the fear of being perceived as nosy or intrusive it’s important to remember that when it comes to mental health, checking in with someone reminds them they aren’t alone when they’ve gone quiet. 

In the summer of 2018 I found myself struggling with depression more than ever before. Work became increasingly difficult to show up to, I feared confiding in anyone about my mental health because I saw myself as a burden.

I quit my job because of mental health stigma

Next time you hear someone say how far we’ve come in the fight against mental health, take a moment to consider that statement. 1 in 4 people suffer from mental illness in the UK – around 15 million people. That’s potentially 1 in 4 people you know - one of your close friends, a family member, or a colleague sitting at the desk next to you.

I experienced mental health stigma at university

My mother used to say I was pretty much always this way. She would say that she could never leave my brother for even a second; else he would bash his head or throw a fit. She said I would just sit still. She could have left me for hours, she said; of course, she didn’t. I would play with one toy, and then wait, consumed by anxiety, until she gave her permission that I could play with another. This confused her. She had never once told me that I needed her permission to play. 

How to support someone with a mental health problem this Christmas

For many, Christmas is an exciting celebration, but for the 1 in 4 people with a mental illness it may be a time of sadness or worry. If you know someone struggling with a mental health problem, they may need a little extra support over the Christmas period.

Those with mental health problems often have to put on a mask and appear happy from day to day, and this can become even harder as the festive period promotes happiness and joy all around. Whilst Christmas promotes happiness in society, it can exacerbate the situation those with mental health problems face.

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