Mental health problems affect 1 in 4 people every year and no one should feel ashamed. By sharing our experiences, together we can end the stigma.

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BPD is not ‘attention seeking’ but a crippling mental illness

Mental illness has a vast and diverse spectrum. In its most simple form, a summary of ill mental health could be; troubles of the mind that has adverse impact on people’s day to day lives. What people often forget is that mental illness may not just affect the recipient, but also the people around them. The chances of encountering ill mental health in a lifetime are approximately one in four, which means if you are lucky enough to escape, you will still most likely be in close contact to someone who hasn’t been as fortunate.

10 things to say to someone with a mental health problem

Recently I’ve come across a number of articles/blog posts about what not to say to a friend/loved one with certain mental health problems. Whilst these are useful, as it’s hard to know what comments could affect others more than you, constantly hearing ‘don’t say this’ and ‘don’t say that’ can make people feel like they have to tiptoe around people who are struggling. This feeling is not necessary and can make the conversation even harder to have than it already is, or prevent it from happening altogether.

Depression is unseen, but it's a serious illness

Through all of my life I have wanted to help people, whether that be in a physical way or a psychological one. It has been my goal since recovering from depression, and will always be my goal for as long as I am alive, to help people understand mental health, and to remove the terrible stigma which still surrounds mental illness.

Mental health stigma is still thriving in 2018

I was told by one of my classmates today that they didn’t ‘want to be involved with someone who self-harmed’ and then looked at me, knowing full well I am involved in that behaviour. It then really hit home how closed-minded some people are, and how we really need some better self-harm education for young adults.

Others are more ashamed of my mental health problems than me

"Crazy Eddie".

"Crazy Eddie" is a nickname one of my British school teachers gave me when I was attending primary school in West Africa, in an end of term review. I faked laughing along as I was mocked, as I had become accustomed to it, and beamed a deceitful smile. It became one of the few coping mechanisms I adopted while in denial. However, the embarrassment I used to face at that particular school was not always humoured like this.

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