Young people and mental health: blogs and stories

Soon I concluded that for me to get better, my friends and teachers needed to know what I was going through. Fortunately I was on good terms with my form tutor who appeared sensitive and understanding. Indeed, this proved to be the case when one day I stayed behind to discuss the problems that I had been having. (Matt)
Depression: "I am a stronger person... because I talked about it"

How can I help?

The aim of the Time to Change campaign is to encourage us all to be more open about our mental health, and to start conversations with those who might need our support.

Why not find out how you could start a conversation about mental health?

You could share a blog story to raise awareness. You could sign up to receive Time to Change emails. And, you might want to add your name to our pledge wall, joining the thousands of people who are taking small steps to be more open about mental health.

Personal blogs from young people with experience of mental health problems

The following blog posts are written by young people with personal experience of mental health problems. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.

Fathers: talk with your sons about mental health

"Well, now you're not alone. We'll get through this together."

These were the first words my dad said to me after I completely broke down and confessed all of my darkest thoughts about myself and explained the true extent of my mental illness. He didn't run, he didn't scream and shout or get angry, he didn't question me. It felt like an out-of-body experience, like I was watching myself tell him about a part of my life that had plagued me for so many years.

We need more mental health awareness and education to change attitudes

Hello lovelies. My name is Katie Ellen and I have struggled with anxiety and depression for as long as I can remember. However, I wasn't professionally diagnosed until my late teens and this is mainly because I was scared. Scared to open up, scared of the truth and most of all scared of the stigma that comes with being ‘mentally ill’.

If only people did not believe the mental health stereotypes in the media

I spent most of my childhood and teenage years hiding my mental health, partly because it was never spoken about. I didn’t know what mental health was and the little I did know was based on what I had seen on television. I grew up believing that a person had to be thin to have an eating disorder and that a mental health hospital was all strait-jackets and restraints, but my beliefs were wrong.


Email updates

Keep up to date with all our news, information and events via email.

Media centre

Guidelines and contacts for all those who work in the media.


Download leaflets, posters, reports and guidance.

Need support?

If you need urgent support there are many places to go for help.