Friends, family and mental health: blogs and stories

These blogs are written by people with personal experience of mental health problems and about their experiences of friends, family and mental health. This could be a mother writing about how she supported her daughter or someone writing about how their friends treated them differently after learning of their mental illness

Our Stigma Shout survey showed that almost 9 out of 10 people with mental health problems (87%) reported the negative impact of stigma and discrimination on their lives. The research also showed that the way family, friends, neighbours and colleagues behave can have a big impact on the lives of people with mental health problems.

Simply talking to someone about their mental health problem can help strengthen relationships, help recovery and challenge the stigmatising stereotypes that surround mental illness.

By writing about their personal experiences of mental health, these bloggers aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects people across the country. Pledge to share your experience of mental health today >>


Thank you for seeing past my depression

I spent the first ten years of my adult life living with the crushing weight of depression bearing down on me constantly. This weight stunted my emotional growth and development just when I should have been standing tall, emerging as the woman that I was to become. It took me a decade to find treatment that could help me. This decade left its mark: scars that run deep, flashbacks and fears that are never far from the surface.

True friends are there for a mate going through deperession

I’m Chris. I'm 21. I've lived with depression for most of my life, ever since I was a kid. I never used to understand the thoughts and feelings that I had. In my teenage years, I started to develop feelings of low self-esteem and confidence that affected my everyday actions and thoughts. I never talked to anyone about what I was going through – ever. I just hid my thoughts and feelings and thought I could deal with it that way. That was such a mistake.

When my friend was unwell, I stepped up to be there for them

Sometimes the thought of being there for someone can be pretty daunting. We question whether we’ll have the time, whether we can say the right thing, and perhaps if we’re having a hard time too, whether we can truly give another person the support they might need. In my experience however, being there for someone can range from offering up my spare time or gifts, to simply sending a text and letting someone know you’re thinking about them.

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