These blogs are written by people who have personal experience of self-harming. By writing about the issue they aim to help breakdown the stereotypes and stigmatising ideas that can be associated with self harm.

If you are self-harming you should talk to you GP for help or call the Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90. You can find more information about what self harm is from Rethink Mental Illness, Mind and the NHS.


Mental health stigma is still thriving in 2018

I was told by one of my classmates today that they didn’t ‘want to be involved with someone who self-harmed’ and then looked at me, knowing full well I am involved in that behaviour. It then really hit home how closed-minded some people are, and how we really need some better self-harm education for young adults.

Talking about my self-harm helped me feel less ashamed

It is estimated that 4 in 100 people in the UK struggle with self-harm. It is one of the most common coping mechanisms for those suffering mental illnesses, yet it is still a taboo subject.

Self-harm is when someone intentionally harms or injures themselves. It is often a way of coping with overwhelming thoughts and feelings, and is very misunderstood.

My recovery is tied to the support of friends, family and teachers

When I was 14 years old, I was suspended two weeks before the official start of the Christmas holidays. I’d been self-harming for months at my boarding school, while firmly believing that I’d been exceptionally secretive.

Fortunately, I was surrounded by a group of people who pulled away every lie and excuse until I had no choice left but to accept help. At the time, I hated them all. Despite the hours that these people had spent trying to understand and support me, I felt deeply betrayed.

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