1 in 6 British workers are affected by conditions like anxiety and depression every year. It is a myth that people with mental health problems can’t work. With the right support people with mental health problems perform vital roles in workplaces across the country.

However, mental health stigma and discrimination in the workplace remain an issue. The blogs below are written by people who have experience of mental illness in the workplace and show the different ways people can react.

By writing about their experiences they aim to raise awareness of the issue and challenge stereotypes around something that can affect all of us. Pledge to talk about your experiences of mental health >>

Read more about what support is available at work and information for managers and employers.


Employers see my anxiety as a risk

Having spent almost my whole life living with the effects of anxiety and then recovering after therapy, there's still one thing people (and admittedly, myself) dislike talking about: being out of work.

I felt guilty about my depression

A year ago, I was one of those people who, if someone was stressed or depressed, would probably have thought: “What do they have to be depressed about?”

Employers should see past mental illness

Work and mental illness are very hard to balance. Trust me, I know.

Unemployed, I was so miserable, and my mental health took a huge hit. The constant effort I had to put in to get some money was hard to keep up when I felt like a failure after every rejection.

Seeing friends and telling them I still didn't have a job was embarrassing. Everyone kept talking about what they were doing and where they wanted their career to go. I just stood there feeling like an idiot.

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