The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of eating disorders. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.


People with mental illness are real people too

PennyFebruary 12, 2018

There is a secret; one that nobody is prepared to talk about; one so shocking it may bring down society as we know it. Am I talking about a scandal, or some sort of political corruption? Am I talking about some secret society that quietly rules over us, or perhaps I am talking about the fact we are all lizard people. While I would infinitely prefer to talk about any one of these things, I am in fact talking about the truth that, literally, nobody is talking about. I am talking about the fact that people with mental illness walk among us.

At school, I heard people talk about mental illness in a negative way

Rose AnneFebruary 6, 2018

When I think back to my first year of secondary school, I didn’t really know much about mental health. I could maybe have named a couple of mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety, but there were so many things I didn’t understand. I definitely didn’t realise that anyone, including myself, could develop a mental health problem.

My family and friends have supported me throughout my eating disorder

MichelleOctober 23, 2017

The Time to Change #inyourcorner campaign got me thinking about mental health and how important it is to know that you have someone 'in your corner', someone looking out for you and stood beside you no matter what.

I have been really lucky throughout my mental health struggles and recovery because I have a truly amazing family. The word supportive doesn't even come close.

But it's important to remember that being supportive and supporting someone doesn't mean that you have to 'get it'.

I campaign to change mental health attitudes because no one should go through what I did

September 7, 2017

I first properly experienced mental health issues at the age of 15 was when, and with this came a lot of damaging attitudes and actions. When I started going to therapy for treatment of depression and anxiety, I was still at school and my peers told me that ‘I didn’t look like a psycho’, which is kind of a backwards compliment that made me feel I had to be sicker.

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