The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of anxiety. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.


I have an amazing support system, but I still face stigma every day

Stop worrying.  Chill out.  What’s the matter with you?

I have dealt with depression and anxiety for around two years now, and people still ask me these questions.  How am I supposed to tell them that I can’t stop worrying, that I don’t know how to chill out and that everything is the matter with me?  That I cannot turn off the endless stream of thoughts, that it sometimes it feels as if my own brain is attacking me.

Anxiety is more than being too sensitive

The doctors describe me as a patient with significant anxiety…but really, I feel like I’m just going a little crazy. It feels like people look at anxiety as a modern thing, something that’s new and can’t be easily understood. Some people describe it as putting a label on ‘being sensitive’, that ‘everything has a have a diagnosis these days’. 

Don't want to date me because I have a mental illness? Your loss!

I’ve lived with anxiety and depression along with an eating disorder pretty much as long as I can remember, but understand that that doesn't define me: I am ME.

I have never really felt stigmatised because of this, and I’m very much a 'take me as I am' person, at least on the outside. Recently though, I had my first blatant experience of stigmatisation, and I’m so angry and shocked I feel I need to speak out about it...

My anxiety isn't attention seeking - it's a real problem

Some people (who clearly have never experienced a mental health problem) believe that those of us that suffer from a mental illness are attention seekers. Of course, this isn’t true. As someone who has experienced anxiety, the last thing I want is for the attention to be on me. 

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