Psychosis: blogs and stories

​The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of psychosis. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.

Find out more about the symptoms, causes and treatments of psychosis from MindRethink Mental Illness and the NHS.

I’d rather people ask questions about my schizophrenia, than assume

Responses from employers, when they have discovered that I have schizoaffective disorder, have been wide ranging. This has been from the humiliation of being marched unceremoniously from the premises, by a ridiculous number of panicked little men in ill-fitting suits, or to the wonderful rare occurrence of the university HR department last month, who talked me through my fear of speaking to a lecture hall full of first year students.

People’s negative attitudes cause me more worry than my psychosis

In 2001, I began to have difficulties with functioning well and had a number of unrealistic thoughts about my social situation, which placed a strain on my friendships with the people in my social group. I also began to worry about my job security, which may or may not have been well-founded. I asked my parents if they could help me and fortunately they were happy to let me come back home and support me.

Misconceptions about psychosis: my experience

Sometimes people can misunderstand psychosis. There are so many misconceptions. People who suffer with psychosis are violent, unpredictable and the most debilitating assumption of all, they can never recover.

I would like to challenge these stereotypes by telling my story. I come from a difficult background and have a long history of mental health difficulty. By my late teens I'd been diagnosed with many conditions namely OCD, anxiety, depression and emotionally unstable personality disorder. I'd been given more labels then Tesco's!

There should be no shame in experiencing psychosis

Three years ago last month, my mind lost touch with reality in a very rapid turn of events that culminated in an acute manic episode of bipolar affective disorder. Having been diagnosed with bipolar in 2004, I had not experienced any mania or hypomania (a lesser manic state) in ten years, although I had fallen into a suicidal depression just six months earlier.

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