​The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of psychosis. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.

Find out more about the symptoms, causes and treatments of psychosis from MindRethink Mental Illness and the NHS.

People with mental illness are real people too

PennyFebruary 12, 2018

There is a secret; one that nobody is prepared to talk about; one so shocking it may bring down society as we know it. Am I talking about a scandal, or some sort of political corruption? Am I talking about some secret society that quietly rules over us, or perhaps I am talking about the fact we are all lizard people. While I would infinitely prefer to talk about any one of these things, I am in fact talking about the truth that, literally, nobody is talking about. I am talking about the fact that people with mental illness walk among us.

Mental health is dismissed within my culture

SonamJanuary 15, 2018

Mental health was not a term known to me until around two years ago. I didn’t know anything about the importance of your own wellbeing, nor did I understand the devastating impact it would have on people I know. If I know anything about mental health issues it’s through my own research after a conversation with colleagues or friends. Whilst I love my heritage, the reason I knew nothing of about it is probably down to my culture and community. 

Psychosis

A person experiencing psychosis perceives the world in a different way to those around them, including hallucinations, delusions or both.

What is psychosis?

A person experiencing psychosis perceives the world in a different way to those around them, including hallucinations, delusions or both:

Personal stories about psychosis

We have 38 stories on psychosis

I’d rather people ask questions about my schizophrenia, than assume

September 25, 2017

Responses from employers, when they have discovered that I have schizoaffective disorder, have been wide ranging. This has been from the humiliation of being marched unceremoniously from the premises, by a ridiculous number of panicked little men in ill-fitting suits, or to the wonderful rare occurrence of the university HR department last month, who talked me through my fear of speaking to a lecture hall full of first year students.

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