The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of eating disorders. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.


I campaign to change mental health attitudes because no one should go through what I did

I first properly experienced mental health issues at the age of 15 was when, and with this came a lot of damaging attitudes and actions. When I started going to therapy for treatment of depression and anxiety, I was still at school and my peers told me that ‘I didn’t look like a psycho’, which is kind of a backwards compliment that made me feel I had to be sicker.

Being judged for my mental illness was so damaging

I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety when I was 16 years old and started counselling sessions. I was so ashamed of it, that I would lie about where I was going. I didn’t want people to know I was having counselling, in case they labelled me “crazy” or “insane”.

Anorexia is not a fad or glamorous

When I was 15, my mum noticed my behaviour changing towards food. I thought she was overreacting, being stupid and that there was nothing wrong with me, but she took me to the doctor regardless.

“We were told that it was just a teenage phase. In my mind, this confirmed my belief that I was fine.”

I am an eating disorder survivor and I am not ashamed

I have never found it easy to share my story about my Anorexia. I struggle with people knowing too much about me, and am always afraid of judgement. Afraid it will hold me back in my career and afraid of people watching my every move and judging everything I eat.                                                                                            

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