These blogs are written by people with personal experience of mental illness. They review and reflect on some of the ways mental health has been portrayed in the media, including TV episodes and newspaper articles.

The way mental illness is portrayed and reported in the media is incredibly powerful in educating and influencing the public. Our Media Advisory Service works with journalists, script writers and other media professionals to help ensure fictional and factual portrayals of people with mental health problems in the media are accurate and sensitive.

By writing about their own experiences and their reactions to these portrayals, these bloggers raise awareness of the different attitudes they have encountered to their mental health and how the media can help shape these attitudes. Pledge to help end mental health stigma today >>


Don't Get Me Wrong - Erik on the airwaves

September 16, 2010

I was in the radio studios again yesterday talking about our new campaign, which aims to show how stigma and discrimination affects people in everyday life. And I was privileged to have the opportunity to work with our new Time to Change pin-up boy, Erik, the star of the latest burst of our campaign. Ruby Wax calls herself the 'poster girl for depression' having featured in our campaign last year, so I think it only fair we call Erik our pin-up boy!

Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before...No Actually Don't‚ Just Tell Someone Else Who Hasn't

January 20, 2009

Stop me if you've heard this one before...no actually don't. Having a mental illness makes finding work hard. This might sound many things; astounding, sad, ridiculous, perverse, surprising, frightening, unlikely, justifiable, understandable or just blindingly obvious. You might secretly feel something you would not publicly air. It's nothing to be ashamed of, we all have overt or latent prejudices, but it is most certainly something to be aware of and to open your mind about.

Starting employment: The reporter's story

January 20, 2009

In the 1990s during my A-Levels I developed ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome after three-weeks of type A or B influenza caused my immune system to collapse and never recover. I didn't get diagnosed for some years, so had to drop out of university, and suffered a “breakdown" more properly known as a major depressive episode.

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