1 in 10 young people will experience a mental health problem each year. For young people who have a mental health problem, their their experience at school can have a big impact. Because young people may be talking or thinking about mental health for the first time, the way their classmates and teachers approach the issue is really important. These blogs explore what it's like to have a mental health problem as a young person, and how teachers and classmates can make a difference. 

We need to discuss mental health issues in school

We need to keep people in schools by ensuring that mental health issues are discussed, not hidden away

“So, two A’s for English I see. Well, I hardly think you deserve them given your lack of attendance to my class.” That is what my English teacher said to me on GSCE results day. It all seems so long ago now but I will never forget how my teacher decided to shame me rather than praise me for my success.

See me after school: It's OK to be myself, and to experience anxiety

I’m been thinking about root causes of anxiety. claire blog How & why does it develop? Are some people simply born with an anxious temperament, or does traumatic experience trigger it? Personally I think it’s a mixture. I was born with the ability to develop an anxious condition if the right environment were presented.  For me, this environment was secondary school.

Stand Up Kid, Stand Up Teacher - talking about mental health in a school

As a ‘Time to change Champion' you get to have many interesting conversations with lovely people, usually one to one, but every so often you get a wonderful opportunity to talk to groups. One of these opportunities led to potentially the best conversation of my life, and a critical moment in my recovery, all at a Time to Change event. There was a little issue with this group that I was stood in front of, besides my wife, her colleagues and friends, a former teacher of mine, and just over 200 year 9’s (13 and 14 year olds) in a large Comprehensive school.

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