The following blog posts are written by people with personal experience of depression. By talking openly, our bloggers hope to increase understanding around mental health, break stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that – like physical health – affects us all.


Mental health shouldn’t be a taboo subject

It's never easy telling someone about your mental health. It's never easy trying to explain the heavy feeling in your chest, the lack of motivation you have, the heavy head and whirlwind of sad thoughts constantly sitting in the back of your head. 

Talking about my mental health inspired my mates to do the same

I’m unsure I’ve ever been described as an ‘inspiration’, until now. Should it even matter?

I think it does because words – carefully-chosen or not – can shape attitudes. How often have we watched, or read about, a Paralympian’s medal-winning success and the adjective ‘inspirational’ has been used? It’s meant as a sincere compliment, and yet an unintended consequence may be to reinforce what makes them different.

Talking about mental health with mates has been life-changing

We are Emma and Sophie and two years ago we bumped into each other while we were out for dinner. We had been really good friends in the past but had fallen out of touch over the last few years. We had never meant to lose touch but we had both been scared that too much time had gone by to reconnect.

It makes all the difference when people are understanding of my depression

I was first diagnosed with clinical depression at the age of 16. Since then, I’ve gone through really low patches every few years. For me, depression feels like losing the will to live. I stop caring about everything and anyone, especially myself. Even getting out of bed becomes an insurmountable obstacle, so I just don't even try.

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