How to be in your mate's corner

Having a mate in your corner can make all the difference when you have a mental health problem. So, if your mate is acting differently, step in. It's not hard - read these stories to see how it's done. 

Talking about mental health with mates has been life-changing

We are Emma and Sophie and two years ago we bumped into each other while we were out for dinner. We had been really good friends in the past but had fallen out of touch over the last few years. We had never meant to lose touch but we had both been scared that too much time had gone by to reconnect.

My mum's there for every anxious phone call

"Which side of the road do we drive on in this country?" 

"Are you this sarcastic with all your students?" I asked my dear mother.

"Normally I just say 'Bonjour!'"

I do like to use that one on my driver friends. I also enjoy "If it was a boat, I would've fallen in", when someone parks too far from the kerb. (When I reminded my mum of these wisecracks recently, she responded "I'm hilarious! [cry laugh face emoji]".)

My mate visiting me in hospital started my recovery

After being hospitalised for a number of days for the first time, fairly delirious, paranoid, and generally feeling unwell; my best friend came to visit. I had not seen him in many years, and this was a friend who I would see on almost a daily basis, someone who was always there, but having moved away it was no longer possible to see him as much. I had been unwell for a number of weeks and it was all new, unfamiliar, and distressing. Not only was I dealing with the illness itself, but now, finding myself in a hospital surrounded by new faces and settings it was all rather overwhelming.

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