Time to Change Champions are people with lived experience of mental health problems who campaign to end mental health discrimination in their communities.

Lots of Champions choose to write about their experiences or personal stories through a blog. Blogs are a fantastic way to help tackle discrimination and challenge attitudes. Take a look a below at some of our Champions blogs.

Interested in blogging for Time to Change?

Take at look at our guidelines for blogging. If you are interested in blogging in your role as a Champion, we are particularly interested in:

  • Blogs about your role as a Champion
  • Blogs about why you became a Champion
  • How becoming a Champion has enabled you to speak out about mental health problems/speak out against stigma and discrimination

My manager's response made a huge difference to my mental health

Lauren, July 22, 2020

I’ve experienced mental health problems for many years now, but apart from a few close friends and family members, I found it hard to talk about. I felt that no one around me could understand what I was going through just trying to get through day-to-day life, at work and generally.

In 2018 I had a particularly negative experience in my workplace at the time. I disclosed my generalised anxiety disorder and social anxiety to my line manager. She gave a dismissive response and an unfortunate, repeated stigmatising attitude.

Ask twice and let them know you're there to listen

Bernice, October 21, 2019

Someone who has shown me they were in my corner was my friend Sandra who I first met at work; we became friends after recognising our similar tastes in books, and penchant for morning coffee.

We'd eventually come to realise we had more in common than initially thought.

I don't know how to explain it fully but when I talked to her, about anything and everything I felt that sense of "this is a safe space, this person gets me".

I am not my mental health condition - I'm a person living with it

Chloe, September 10, 2019

I always knew I was different. From as young as I can possibly remember I knew I wasn’t like other children. I felt things way more intensely and came across as dramatic when I tried to express myself.

My mother, like many people her age, saw mental illness as something to be embarrassed about.  When I started to have emotional outbursts at school or I’d cry and beg her not to fall asleep during the day because the anxiety I felt was unbearable I was just labelled a child with behavioural problems. I was always made to feel like I chose to be this way. 

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