Time to Change Champions are people with lived experience of mental health problems who campaign to end mental health discrimination in their communities.

Lots of Champions choose to write about their experiences or personal stories through a blog. Blogs are a fantastic way to help tackle discrimination and challenge attitudes. Take a look a below at some of our Champions blogs.

Interested in blogging for Time to Change?

Take at look at our guidelines for blogging. If you are interested in blogging in your role as a Champion, we are particularly interested in:

  • Blogs about your role as a Champion
  • Blogs about why you became a Champion
  • How becoming a Champion has enabled you to speak out about mental health problems/speak out against stigma and discrimination

Leading a Time to Change campaign group

I couple of years ago I decided to sign up as a Champion for Time to Change, I saw it as a way to turn my negative experiences with mental health into a positive, little did I know that I would become a champion campaign group leader and help facilitate the Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) Time to Change Group.

Finding my voice as a Time to Change Young Champion

Three years ago, I lost my voice. I could still say what I was expected to, say what people wanted me to, say whatever I was told to, but I couldn’t seem to find my voice. I could say whatever anyone needed me to, anyone but me. My voice had been almost silenced by the people around me. I was made quieter by the people who called me selfish, the people who thought I was weak, the people who convinced me I wasn’t worth their time or energy, all because of my worsening mental health.

A day at the Children and Young People Bristol Roadshow

On Tuesday 1 March, we hosted our third children and young people Roadshow event aimed at the voluntary sector, schools and others working with children and young people. At the event, a panel of young people and representatives from YoungMinds, Off the Record Bristol and the British Youth Council spoke about their personal experiences of mental health problems and the opportunities for local services to engage in joint working and share their learning to tackle stigma and discrimination.

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