These blogs offer advice and tips on how to talk about mental health to friends, colleagues and family. 

They are written by people with personal experiences of mental health problems who, through talking about mental health openly, aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects people across the country.


My best friend makes life with BPD more manageable

Having a personality disorder is not fun or smart. In fact, some days I wish I would wake up and it would just be gone - I would be me again without all these thoughts and emotions. 

My journey has been a long painful one. I’ve never been close to my family and I got burned by too many friends to keep them - so it was just me most of my life.

You can’t always be there for someone struggling – and that’s ok

‘How can I help?’ and ‘What can I do?’ - these two questions have been at numerous times asked by concerned friends, but as I have pondered what response would best suit the occasion, I’ve never truly answered, because simply, I’ve not known the answer.

How do you let others help you when you don’t always know how to help yourself? That very question for me can be taken on an individual level, and a macroscopic level just as much.

How to support someone with a mental health problem this Christmas

For many, Christmas is an exciting celebration, but for the 1 in 4 people with a mental illness it may be a time of sadness or worry. If you know someone struggling with a mental health problem, they may need a little extra support over the Christmas period.

Those with mental health problems often have to put on a mask and appear happy from day to day, and this can become even harder as the festive period promotes happiness and joy all around. Whilst Christmas promotes happiness in society, it can exacerbate the situation those with mental health problems face.

Dumping the Scales will help fight the stigma around eating disorders!

It is estimated that there are over 1.6 million people suffering from diagnosed or undiagnosed eating disorders throughout the UK. But the truth is, there will be thousands who don’t feel able to reach out for support. People who feel like they aren’t “sick enough”, “don’t look like they have an eating disorder” or are too embarrassed, because they don’t fit that “stereotypical eating disorder image” we all have in our heads.

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