These blogs offer advice and tips on how to talk about mental health to friends, colleagues and family. 

They are written by people with personal experiences of mental health problems who, through talking about mental health openly, aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects people across the country.


Little things can reduce mental health stigma

Rhiannon, May 29, 2018

I am ashamed to say that most of my life I have ignored mental health stigma. I am even more ashamed to say that what has woken me up to it, has been my personal experience.

Why so ashamed you might say? We all only tend to care about something once it affects us personally.

I don’t choose to have bipolar or feel this way

Becky, April 23, 2018

I’ve never really talked about my mental health; maybe I’m embarrassed by it or what people will think of me. It often becomes awkward and some people even stop talking to me altogether. Some don’t get it. That’s ok. There’s a lot of illnesses I don’t understand either. Some get annoyed: ‘How can you be sad, what do you have to be sad about, you have a great life. You have me, isn’t that enough for you?’

An open letter to my colleagues about my mental illness

Tash, April 16, 2018

Dear colleagues,

I am sorry.

I realise that my behaviour has impacted those around me, both in the past, and also more recently. I don’t make excuses for the hurt that I’ve caused. And so, I’m writing you this letter because I want you to understand. Because you deserve an explanation and I think this is the best way to give you that explanation. You are honest with me and it is only fair that I do the same.

My experience on a psychiatric ward was not what people expected

Hannah, March 22, 2018

‘You’re being admitted to a mental health unit’ were words I struggled to comprehend. How can I be so high functioning in the legal profession and simultaneously require admission? One minute I was at work and the next minute I found myself at the local Accident and Emergency. I felt vulnerable as the ambulance took me to the unit, and then terrified as I stepped inside the unit and the doors locked behind me. The fear of the unknown consumed me. I felt like the tiniest fish in the biggest ocean.

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