Thousands of individuals have added their voices to our movement to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination.

These blogs are full of great campaigning ideas and stories. They are written by people who have attended our events or have helped us campaign.

By talking about mental health they aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects us all. Pledge to share your experience of mental health today >>


My name is Angela and I’m a young carer

Everyone has a story, everyone has a journey, whether it's just starting or beginning there is a journey that had begun or is yet to begin. Once upon a time my experiences were detrimental. I was constantly attempting to hide what was beneath, beneath all the clothes and smiles and dance moves.

A day at the Children and Young People London roadshow

Recorded live at the first Time to change children and young people Roadshow event, London, 28/01/16

Today is the first of our four children and young people Roadshow events aimed at the voluntary sector, schools and others working with children and young people. We are privileged to have a range of speakers and young champions with lived experience of mental health problems who have kindly agreed to chat to us at today’s event.

Why I use my mental health experience to inspire others

I wanted to write this blog for a few reasons: to try to inspire others to challenge mental health stigma; to give a message of hope, and to show that it's worth continuing to campaign because in my experience things are starting to change. Yes, stigma still exists and continued work is needed but my story regarding employment issues has a positive ending.

Putting a face on mental health: Using my story to promote understanding in my community

My name is Mohammed.Mohammed I was born in Uganda and came to live in England when I was 9 years old. My parents had passed away. During my childhood in England I went through the care system. This was a very difficult time for me. I did not always get along well with my foster carer. I was isolated often, away from people I could relate to. In my teenage years, at school I was introduced to drugs.

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