Thousands of individuals have added their voices to our movement to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination.

These blogs are full of great campaigning ideas and stories. They are written by people who have attended our events or have helped us campaign.

By talking about mental health they aim to break down stereotypes and take the taboo out of something that affects us all. Pledge to share your experience of mental health today >>


The legacy of Becki Luscombe

It was just a little more than a year ago year ago when people in this movement and many others used their experiences, voice and collective ‘muscle’ to stand up to two household names who were stocking offensive Halloween costumes with “mental patient” and “psycho ward” themes.

After so many years of working to improve public understanding and attitudes towards mental health problems and those of us with them, when the supermarkets withdrew the costumes, apologising and making donations this was an historic milestone.  Becki Luscombe was at the very heart of this.

My friends and family are more willing to talk more openly with me about my mental health issues.

With the recent, tragic death of well known and much loved celebrity, Robin Williams, covered so extensively in the media, I have noticed family and friends slowly coming to realise that mental health problems can be experienced by anyone. While the detailed reporting in this case was a little concerning, overall I feel the way in which the media tells these unfortunate stories seems to have changed dramatically in recent years.

Stigma is powerless ash at my feet: How speaking out has transformed me

Join me. 

February 1998. Shell-shocked after a nervous breakdown. I receive my mental illness diagnosis. I have bipolar disorder.

On the wobbly new-born legs of a new identity. I had crossed that big fat safe line between “us” - the sane, and “them” - the mad. I was one of "them". I lost my glamorous, well paid job in the West End of London managing A list celebrities. I was Mentally Ill. For life. I was only 25.

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